Class 5 Hitch

The Class 5 hitch is a weight carrying (WC) and weight distributing (WD) hitch depending on the vehicle and hitch specifications.  Class 5 hitches used as weight carrying are rated up to 12,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1200 lbs. Class V hitches used for weight distributing are rated up to 17,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1700 lbs. Your ball mount and hitch ball need to both be rated for Class V to safely tow these weight loads. To use this class of hitch for weight distribution requires a weight distribution system.  A Class 5 hitch has a 2-1/2″ square receiver opening.  Class 5 tow hitches attach to the vehicle frame only. A Class 5 hitch is considered extra heave duty and requires a weight distributing type of hitch. You will often see a class 5 trailer hitch towing skid loaders, heavy equipment, construction equipment and extra large horse trailers.  The class 5 tow hitch is designed specifically for your tow vehicle and is best suited for heavy duty full-sized pickup trucks, vans and SUVs.


Although trailer hitches can be welded to the frame (which could possibly weaken the frame or result in electrical damage), we suggest using top-of-the-line, custom-fitted hitches that bolt to the frame, and usually use preexisting holes.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES:
Class 1 Hitch
Class 2 Hitch
Class 3 Hitch
Class 4 Hitch
Tongue Weight
Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 5 hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

Class 4 Hitch

The Class 4 hitch is weight carrying (WC) and also is weight distributing (WD) depending on the vehicle and hitch specifications.  They attach directly to the tow vehicle’s frame.  Not all Class IV hitches are rated to be both. See the specific hitch for that information.  # Class IV hitches used as weight carrying are rated up to 10,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1000 lbs.  Class IV hitches used for weight distributing are rated up to 14,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1400 lbs. You will often see a class 4 trailer hitch towing larger boats and horse trailers, larger and heavier campers and storage trailers.   The class 4 tow hitch is designed specifically for your tow vehicle and is best suited for heavy duty full-sized pickup trucks, vans and SUVs.


Trailer hitches are often welded to the frame (which could possibly lead to weakening the frame or result in electrical damage), we suggest using top-of-the-line, custom-fitted hitches that bolt to the frame, and usually use preexisting holes.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES:
Class 1 Hitch
Class 2 Hitch
Class 3 Hitch
Class 5 Hitch
Tongue Weight
Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 4 hitch, class iv hitch, class 4 trailer hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

Trailer Hitch Classes

There are 5 different classes of trailer hitches to choose from.  Each class is sorted by the amount of weight that can be pulled safely.  You should choose a hitch that meets your current maximum towing needs but also consider your towing needs in the future.  You might be towing wave runners this year but a speed boat next year.  Always choose the higher class hitch if you are unsure which hitch to get.   Click on each hitch class to get more information.

Class 1 Hitch: Gross trailer weight up to 2000 lbs. Tongue weight up to 200 lbs.  This type of hitching fits all vehicles.

Class 2 Hitch: Gross trailer weight up to 3500 lbs. Tongue weight up to 350 lbs.  This type of hitching fits mid-sized cars, trucks, vans and SUVs.

Class 3 Hitch: Gross trailer weight up to 5000 lbs. Tongue weight up to 500 lbs.  This type of hitching fits mid-sized trucks, vans and SUVs.


Class 4 Hitch: Gross trailer weight up to 12000 lbs. Tongue weight up to 1200 lbs.  This type of hitching fits full-sized cars, trucks, vans and SUVs.

Class 5 Hitch: Gross trailer weight up to 13000 lbs. Tongue weight up to 1300 lbs. This type of hitching fits pickup trucks only.

Check the tow ratings and towing capacity for your tow vehicle as not all vehicles can tow all classes of hitches.   Always pick a hitch that is rated to handle the maximum total weight of the camper or trailer that you plan to tow but that it does not exceed the towing capacity of your tow vehicle.  Your owner’s manual should list the maximum towing and tongue weight that your vehicle can pull.  If you have any questions, call your tow vehicles manufacturer.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES :
Tongue Weight
Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 1 hitch, class 2 hitch, class 3 hitch, class 4 hitch, class 5 hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

Class 3 Hitch

The Class 3 hitch is weight carrying (WC) and also are weight distributing (WD) depending on the vehicle and hitch specifications.  They attach directly to the tow vehicle’s frame.  Not all Class III hitches are rated to be both. See the specific hitch for that information.  Class III hitches used as weight carrying are rated up to 6000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 600 lbs.


Class III hitches used for weight distributing are rated up to 10,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1000 lbs  A Class III hitch is considered to be the standard type of hitching for general towing and will usually have a 2 inch rectangular receiver.  You will often see a class 3 trailer hitch towing boats, small horse trailers, small to medium sized campers.   The class 3 tow hitch is designed specifically for your tow vehicle and is best suited for mid-sized pickup trucks, vans and SUVs.

Trailer hitches are often welded to the frame (which could result in weakening the frame or result electrical damage), we recommend using top-of-the-line, custom-fitted hitches that bolt to the frame, and usually use preexisting holes.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES:
Class 1 Hitch
Class 2 Hitch
Class 4 Hitch
Class 5 Hitch
Tongue Weight
Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 3 hitch, class iii hitch, class 3 trailer hitch, class 3 tow hitch, class iii trailer hitch, class 3 receiver hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

Class 2 Hitch

The Class 2 hitch is a weight carrying hitch and is used for towing up to 3,5000lbs. GTW (gross trailer weight) and 300lbs. tongue weight.  The most common items to tow using the class 2 trailer hitch are small boat trailers, motorcycle trailers, small campers and snowmobile trailers.  The Class 2 tow hitch is best suited for full size trucks, full size vans, SUVs and larger cars and usually attach to the bumper or vehicle frame.  Class II trailer hitch are designed specifically for your tow vehicle however there are some universal class 2 tow hitch products available.


Although trailer hitches are often welded to the frame (which could possibly weaken the frame or result in electrical damage), we recommend using top-of-the-line, custom-fitted hitches that bolt to the frame, and usually use preexisting holes.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES:
Class 1 Hitch
Class 3 Hitch
Class 4 Hitch
Class 5 Hitch
Tongue Weight

Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 2 hitch, class 2 trailer hitch, class 2 tow hitch, class ii trailer hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

Class 1 Hitch

The Class 1 hitch is a weight carrying hitch and is the lightest of all of the trailer hitch classes.  It can handle a GTW (gross trailer weight) of up to 2,000 lbs. and a maximum tongue weight of 200 lbs. A Class 1 trailer hitch can be a drawbar-type hitch or a bumper style hitch.  A drawbar is a removable coupling platform that slides into a hitch receiver and fastens with a pin and clip, or the “tongue” portion of a fixed-tongue hitch.  They also may have a crossbar with a 1 inch or 1 ½ inch square hitch receiver and usually attach to the bumper, truck pan or vehicle frame.  Class 1 tow hitch is most often used on small pickup trucks, small cars, small vans & mini vans.  This type of hitching is most commonly used for light duty towing, bike racks and camping racks.


Although some people still weld trailer hitches to the frame (which could possibly weaken the frame or result in electrical damage), we recommend using top-of-the-line, custom-fitted hitches that bolt to the frame, and usually use preexisting holes.

OTHER RELATED ARTICLES:
Class 2 Hitch
Class 3 Hitch
Class 4 Hitch
Class 5 Hitch
Tongue Weight
Weight Distribution Hitch

[tags]class 1 hitch, class 1 trailer hitch, class 1 tow hitch, trailer hitch classes, hitch classes[/tags]

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